About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
CNNW 3
CNN 2
CSPAN 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN2 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
will likely exceed the $12 billion to $16 billion from hurricane irene which battered the northeast in august of 2011 says a chief economist. and an economics professor at smith ity of maryland school of business estimates it will result in about $35 billion to $45 billion total losses. and another company projects $10 billion to $20 billion of damage about half insured. property damage will be repaired and lost economic output will be adjust set by other increased activity as residents prepare for the hurricane. and here is another story about economic impact from "wall street journal." losses may exceed those of the 2011 storm. airlines and shippers expect an extended disruption. will cost them millions of dollars and leave thousands of fliers and goods stranded. airlines will cancel a total more than 14,600 flights as monday and more than the roughly 10,000 canceled due to hurricane irene in 2011. irene comes united continental holdings about $40 million in revenue. delta airlines said hurricane irene forced it to cancel about 2,200 flights costing $15 million in profits. delta has cancele
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the ele
. the estimates begin at a billion dollars and head north from there. based on the cost of irene at the same time last year when power was out in new england. we get the latest on the storm now from bryan norcross at the weather channel. what's the latest? >> this hurricane is in the bahamas now. and it is heading north. and the big concern, i think it's going to dominate your lives starting this weekend there in the new york city area and all of the northeast. let's take a look at this graphic here. there's the hurricane moving north through the bahamas. it bends offshore but over the weekend, it's affecting the carolinas with pretty good winds right along the coast. and then early next week, it bends in to the northeast. we have never had a storm come out of the topics and bend in like that. so the thinking is that somewhere from props the delaware bay area, south jersey area north, this is going to drive water all along the beaches. and this has the potential to cause tremendous damage along the coastline and the whole scenario we had with irene in new york city and the transportation problems
from hurricane irene last year are -- taking these warnings very seriously this time around. further inland they're bracing for the possibility of heavy snow in west virginia, pennsylvania, and as far inland in fact, as ohio. there is a large swath of the country that need to keep an eye on this thing. not just the coastal areas. as far inland as ohio. >> huge ramifications on halloween, dubbing it frankenstorm. >>> trying to predict where the storm is going to go next. all different patterns. >> we don't know 100%. accuweather meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the latest. jim. >> good morning, rob, paula. here its hurricane sandy, a large storm system, center of circulation moving its way northwest out of the, out of the bahamas. will continue to hug the coast of florida here. not making direct landfall. on florida. but still lashing the coast, with some heavy rain through the day, today, through the weekend, hug the coast of the carolinas. makes a turn more to the north-northeast. flooding rainfall potentially. outer banks, north carolina. coastal south carolina
as washington state. >> memories of hurricane irene last year that left billions in damage have people determined not to get caught offguard. several states have declared emergencies. people are being told to prepare for the worst, possibly five to seven days without power. reporting live in chesapeake bay peek beach, maryland, i'm dannielle leigh, nbc bay area news. >>> could cord blood be used to cure autism? i'm marianne favro. how a cord registry here in the bay area is playing a critical role in new research. >>> the balance of political power at san jose's city hall lays right here in evergreen. i'm danian trujillo. that's up next. >>> decision 2012 now just 11 days away. nationally and locally, the races are coming down to the wire. among the hottest races in the south bay is the fight for the eighth district seat in san jose. this one district could impact the entire city. nbc bay area's damian trujillo joins us in san jose this evening. damian, why is this race so critical? >> reporter: the battle is between incumbent rose herera and her challenger jimmy wynn. herera says this
to be evacuations like we saw with irene. we have evacuations for fire island, though. a low-lying barrier island on the south shore of long island. and you know, you can't take this seriously enough. storm surge is very dangerous. flooding is the leading killer in any kind of hurricanes. this is no ordinary hurricane. this one is a big event. we'll be talking about it throughout the morning. brooke? >> appreciate it. bonnie mentioned north carolina. let's go straight to the coastal area. outer banks, kill devil hills. george howl is standing by for us in an area already very much so apparently getting hit by this hurricane. and george, as i wait to see your picture, i -- here you are, is the rain coming down? >> reporter: yeah, brooke. the rain definitely coming in. it's that sideways rain. combined with sand, helping to -- a good indication that the storm is getting much closer to us. we're in an area, the northwestern quadrant of the storm. that is where you see the storm bringing in bands of heavy rain. these bands of winds that are coming in. in fact, that band right now stretches from wilmi
? >> in terms of intensity? i immediately think of last year's hurricane irene that treated delaware more lightly than it treated our surrounding states. >> any advice for residents there this evening? and what can they expect when the sun comes up later this morning? >> the best advice we are giving now is for people to -- who say well things look good out there, and jm going to go out to the store or go out and do my normal life. take a day. we have flooded roads. we have trees that are down and branches that are down on roadways. we have power lines that are down. so conditions -- there are some dangerous conditions out there across the state. if people go out too early, we could have some issues. we don't want to have that because we have come through pretty good so far. people just need to take a day, stay home, let the highway crews go out and clear the roads. let the electrical crews go out and put the lines back up and deal with those situations and not have to go out and try to rescue people who get themselves in trouble because they just went out too soon. >> gary lange joining
in damage that hurricane sandy will leave in its wake. >> it can be worse than irene did damage up here last year. >>> a look now at your weather on this friday morning while things are still relatively calm. what a rough news day, man. miami, daytona, and orlando could see squalls at a result of hurricane sandy. a new storm system brings rain and snow to the pacific northwest. meanwhile, santa ana winds blow through southern california again. >> mild and humid in baltimore, no, and boston. billings warms up to 34. sounds like a warm-up. and so much colder than usual. >> break out the tank tops. >> that's right. omaha and kansas city are in the mid-40s. >>> and now in the race to finish line in the campaign for president, our latest poll shows the candidates are still close. governor romney's lead is growing. with 11 days to go our abc news/washington post poll showing romney with 50% support among likely voters versus 47% for president obama. but that 3-point difference is still within the margin of error. >>> another key race with national implications is unfolding in the state of massachu
in new york harbor right now, a half a foot higher than hurricane irene. when the high tide starts to flood in late this afternoon, early this evening, we'll see record-breaking surge hikes. >> does that mean water goes in the subway? >> probably. >> probably. >> i don't know what kind of sandbagging efforts that they're going to be having in place. i mean, since irene, i know they've taken some steps to see if they can get some sort of better protection from subway entrances, but the official forecast is calling for a 10 hfgs to 12-foot storm tide and it only needs to be 10.5 feet to flood the subway. >> jeff, we've seen the pictures. we keep hearing the adjectives colossal, gigantic, to describe it. almost in november, cold in the north. how does a storm like this size form? >> well, it started in the caribbean, which it's always warm enough year around to make hurricanes form. and once it got north of the caribbean it found itself right over the gulf stream, at least over the past day or so, and it was in a very unique spot, right over an axis of the warm gulf stream waters that
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
and down the shore. >> it is just like nothing i have ever seen before. you know, we had irene. last year we had a nor'easter in '92. i remember as a kid hurricane donna but nothing like this. there are so many people stranded without shelter. and the damage to the public infrastructure, to the boardwalks, municipal buildings, firehouses it is just endless. bill: frank pallone, thank you. we're going to stay in touch with you and a lot of others down there and hopefully get the word out. if we can help in any way making the word more public we certainly will, sir. thank you and good luck to you and your family. >> thank you. bill: frank pallone, democrat on the jersey shore. waking up to a whole new world as so many people are. >> sandy's wrath is extending into west virgina. have you seen the snow that got dumped on west virgina. look at this scene. blizzard conditions there. up to three feet of snow in some parts of the state. we're live there on the ground now. we're going to tell you what is going on. bill: while we continue to deal with that storm damage we can not forget this. you'r
. 18,100 latest number of flights cancelled. it makes irene look like nothing. there it was some 10,000 flights cancelled then. it cost delta for example 15 million in profits back then. that gives you an idea what the airlines are going to be looking at with this storm. >> bill: we don't -- >> shepard: we don't know when laguardia is going to reopen. estimates how much this could hurt the economy. one thing is perfectly clear the impact will be substantial. >> yeah. here is what i think we are looking at 1-2 punch. first of all we have people staying home at work not getting paychecks. we have businesses that aren't operating here in new york city which is typically a 4 billion-dollar a day economy. could shave a tenth off of national g.d.p. but then we have all these federal dollars come in longer term we will see some kind of benefit from that it's going to take a while for it to play out. $20 billion the colmes of this storm. >> shepard: construction workers and on and on. there may be a dip in unemployment as a result of this. markets were closed for the second time. try tomorr
hurricane irene last was 13,000. double the damaged and down power lines. we have utility crews to restore power but in many cases we don't have enough crews who can remove trees and debris. you can hardly drive anywhere on long island without having to detour because a tree is down against a power line. now, the federal government has something called the national forest service. we need the national forest service with personnel and with chain saws to deploy to long island to help remove the downed trees, the debris, get the power lines back up and the electricity flowing. this is a public safety emergency. it's a public health emergency. it's all related to power. and so, we now need to move from search and rescue mission to a power restoration mission. >> have you called fema? have you called other officials to try to get other help as you described? >> i have. i just left a meeting at the federal staging area at republic airport and there's a national forest service representative there. they actually have crews from the national forest service they have been september to long island.
as to when the lights will come back on. >> during hurricane irene full restoration took eight days. for hurricane sandy full restoration may take longer. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie took a 4 1/2 hour long helicopter tour of devastated areas in his state. he's thanking volunteers and first responders and comforting those who have lost everything. >> very difficult time. very difficult day. so we just start. we survived. >> reporter: new jersey is not the only state recovering today. new york governor andrew cuomo was also touring damage in manhattan where underground tunnels and subway stations are full of corrosive seawater. even still officials are saying the worst is behind them. >> it's the beginning of a process that we all know will take a while, but this is the end of the down side and hopefully from here is going up. >> reporter: as the storm now moves towards canada, an air travel tracking website says more than 18,000 flights have been canceled due to the storm. in absecon, new jersey, craig boswell, fox news. >>> ocean city took a beating. guess we'
irene, goes by, the wind goes to the west even though it's strong to the west. it blows everything out. in this particular case, the wind keeps coming in from the southeast. >> yeah. all right. so the next thing i want to ask in terms of what -- for the people that didn't leave and heed the warning of governor cuomo in new york, governor kristchris kristi in new jersey, there a chance their homes could be below water. >> yeah. they could be below water for quite a while. what will happen is the tide tries to go out, and the wind will keep trying to stop the tietide from going out. it's a y dangerous situation. one of the things i got real upset with and i talked to you yesterday for quite a while about the whole situation is not putting the hurricane warning in effect because people think oh, it's a big nor'easter coming. big deal. we've gone through big nor'easters before. when the hurricane warning is put in effect because you have a hurricane coming, it's a very different story. my suggestion is once you've named that storm, you leave the name and the class fakings is important. >>
in the republican party is trying to do that. unlike when some people immediately decided that hurricane irene would be the obama katrina. a couple people, including newt gingrich, suggested a quick response this time was at odds with the respond." pose -- at odds with the response posed to the staff in benghazi, libya. we will have to wait to see what the response is. host: final question for you -- how was this impacting the journalists that cover the campaign? caller: one thing that we are expecting an impact on, e-mail and electricity service in the washington, d.c. area. there are contingency plans for that kind of emergency. i am not the person in charge of that. we're going to continue to do our coverage as long as it is safe to do sohost: bob, thank you so much for covering that force this -- before us morning. we would like to hear what you think the impact could be. bill writes in on twitter -- host: looking at some of the front pages of the newspapers as they cover the storm, this is from "the new york daily news." "shot, city braces for a monster." -- "shut, the city braces for a monster
rode out irene here also. i figured even if this storm was many orders of magnitude bigger, which it was, i'd only get a little flooding, and thankfully, at high tide on monday night -- 8:22 p.m., i'll always remember that exact time -- that turned out to be the case. megyn: for you they did, for others not so much. it's a very narrow island where the ocean is on one side and the bay is on the other, and i believe it's only one time in history that the two met due to storm surge or other reasons, and it happened this time with the main road that runs through long beach island looking like an ocean, and you can see some of the devastation in these pictures that resulted. describe the scene as you know it now outside. >> um, well, i can't see very much of the island. as you head down the main boulevard south from my town, you eventually -- in the southbound lane you come to a police car with its lights flashing, and they'll tell you the only people south of that point are, um, you know, crucial personnel or anyone who agrees to be escorted off the island by the police. so that's as
receive an order to evacuate as they did before hurricane irene? >> no, i have seen all the e-mails on this. they didn't receive an order before to evacuate the hospital. however, they made a very wise decision to evacuate the hospital when they lost power. and i think the key here is that they did it without anyone dying. charles: right. that's -- >> charles, as you said, can they anticipate something like this? the problem here is the generators are in the basement. that may not be the best place for all the generators. charles: again, listen, we're monday morning quarterbacking here. someone should have said hey maybe one generator should be above where any flooding can happen, but how do you think the hospital recovers from this? i mean this is certainly a public relations fiasco. >> well, not only a public relations problem, although it depends on what the focus is. maybe it is going to be on how heroic they were, but also they have no patients now. they don't have any intermet. they don't have any phones. -- they don't have any internet or phones. they don't know when po
of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toé@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
hurricanes will hit the northeast part of the united states. arguably, irene and sandy were not major hurricanes on the salve fir simpson scale. but if you look back at the 1950s a similar type of weather patterns produced tin major hurricanes up the eastern seaboard in a seven-year period including one, donna, gave hurricane-force winds everywhere from florida to maine. there is nothing new under the sun. you're seeing recycling what happened before except a lot of people don't know what happened before. a lot of that people say where is this coming from? basically go back and take a look at the maps. you will see where it came from. jenna: we forget quickly. tough to forget images we're seeing out of this storm. joe, nice to have you with us today. we appreciate the context very much. >> my pleasure. thank you for having me. jon: prayers for the victims it appeared survivors of superstorm sandy. pope benedict offering his condolences from the vatican expressing solidarity with all of the recovery crews. plus a new call for president obama to answer key questions about the deadly ter
are open as of now. expectations are almost 12 foot storm surge. irene at 9 in comparison just to give you an idea of what we're looking at here. we're also starting to see some twitter pictures come in of the main fishing pier in ocean city, maryland being washed away. pictures of atlantic city underwater. it is a little tricky for us to put emphasis on campaign developments knowing what's to come weatherwise and that obviously is of the utmost concern especially in people safety but we do only have eight days left. that means weighing the impact on everything from early voting of course now to access and power to the polling places on election day itself. it is harder to get out the vote door knocking when people can't get out and about. the millions of dollars that conservatives have saved up to bombard the airways in the homestretch may be waste if the no one can watch tv. and even the news itself is going to be all storm all the time at least until the worst seemed to have past. it will change the nature of th
million more than we had in irene. >> wow. >> so it is -- it is a completely devastating storm from that perspective. and i think what we're going to find, unfortunately, when we get to the jersey shore today is just total devastation. >> yeah. >> and that's the real concern. because not only is it people's homes and private property, but also you have the tourism industry in new jersey which is one of our biggest industries. we're going to have to work hard to make sure we're ready for next summer at the jersey shore. >> governor chris christie, our prayers are with the state of new jersey this morning. thank you very much. >> thank you, governor, good luck. >> mika, joe, mike, willie, thank you all you guys, appreciate it. >>> coming up in minutes, author of the best-selling book "the perfect storm" and "war," we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. on ga
. into conversations, there has been discussions that perhaps down the road may be enrichment on irene cho can be accepted. perhaps at some point, we don't know when, some of the sanctions, could be lifted. secondly, to president obama's credit, he is no saddam hussein. which means that when saddam hussein made a decision, you either agree with it or you would die if you're inside the iraqi political establishment. saddam did not have to deal with a pesky congress nor did he have to do with an israeli prime minister. as a result, the iranians have the confidence that saddam had the strength to be able to live up to his end of the bargain. that is not the perception that the iranians have, rightly or wrongly, about president obama. can president obama promise the lifting of sanctions, most of these sanctions that really are hurting their rings have gone through congress and now to be lifted if there's a congressional district. can anyone here remember last time congress lifted sanctions in a swift manner? moreover, the principal level that establishes the principle of reciprocity. the idea that
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)